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Communicators Reflect on a Godly Man

posted on November 14, 2015, under Member by

by Gladys Neigel

Herbert Warren Pritchard, 1928-2015, represented Ocala Church as a communicator for 16 years. (Photo: Betty Kossick)

Herbert Warren Pritchard, 1928-2015, represented Ocala Church as a communicator for 16 years. (Photo: Betty Kossick)

Pardon us for allowing our feelings to show through. Pardon us as we take a moment of reflection for a colleague…

One of our Florida Conference communication team members has written his last article, sent his last e-mail, and shared his last story. Herbert Warren Pritchard passed away August 28, 2015.

From an administrative career with the denomination to his personal appearance, he was meticulous in every detail. He would take this same attribute and put it to good use when he began to write as the communication director for Ocala Church. His first byline appeared in Southern Tidings in April 1999, and his last article for the September 2015 issue was in production at the time of his unexpected death.

A wordsmith by skill, Herb’s writings reflected his love for young people and their involvement in ministry. His last article in Florida Focus, entitled “Ocala Youth Catch the Vision to Serve,” merited a place on the back cover of the Spring 2015 issue’s Generation Change feature.

Herb, left, assists with a photography segment during Florida Conference’s Communication Training Workshop in 2006. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Herb, left, assists with a photography segment during Florida Conference’s Communication Training Workshop in 2006. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Reflections from some of the people who knew him best:

“Kindness, developed through a true Christian spirit, is what we remember most about Herb.” John Kossick (a friend from boyhood) and his wife Betty.

“His gentleness was so reflective of another great man, Jesus! No wonder he was always smiling when I saw him.” Doreen Negley, friend.

“He would always have the right scripture when you were feeling down or discouraged and remind you to give thanks in times of gladness.” Brandon Clarke, grandson.

Herb and his wife, Judy. (Photo: Betty Kossick)

Herb and his wife, Judy. (Photo: Betty Kossick)

“Herb always made sure his family was loved, that they knew of God, and that he would always be there for them. He was a true patriarch of the family.” Stacy Wetmore, granddaughter.

Herb’s writings live on through the archives of Florida Focus and Southern Tidings. His Christian example lives on through the numerous people, young and old, he encouraged throughout the years.

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Spring Meadows Church Member Serves in Zambia

posted on November 03, 2015, under Member by

by Angela Baerg

Jeffrey Brownlow, left, a member of Spring Meadows Church in Sanford, served with friends Kristopher Thompson and Moses Maier in Zambia last school year. This fall, all three returned to Southern Adventist University to continue their studies. (Photo: Danielle Schafer, MUR Photos)

Jeffrey Brownlow, left, a member of Spring Meadows Church in Sanford, served with friends Kristopher Thompson and Moses Maier in Zambia last school year. This fall, all three returned to Southern Adventist University to continue their studies. (Photo: Danielle Schafer, MUR Photos)

Jeffrey Brownlow, a member of Spring Meadows Church in Sanford, felt convicted to go overseas as a student missionary during his junior year at Southern Adventist University in Collegedale, Tennessee. One night, he prayed before going to bed and asked God to show him where he was most needed. He awoke the next morning to see a simple text message from his friend, Moses Maier. He hadn’t told Moses he was considering mission work. The text said, “Hey man, come with me to Africa.”

Jeffrey and Moses began to research mission opportunities and were particularly intrigued by a construction placement where they would build one-day churches and schools with Riverside Farm in Zambia, Africa. The first time Jeffrey and Moses visited a one-day church construction site, they mainly watched, trying to absorb the whole process and stay out of the way.

“I was used to watching construction with bulldozers and cement trucks,” Jeffrey says. “In Zambia, you are the bulldozer. You are the cement truck. It was amazing how quickly the structure was assembled using sheer manpower.”

Before long, they could keep pace as they worked alongside their Zambian brothers. Jeffrey looked forward to visiting new villages where they were eagerly welcomed by people who were excited about their new steel church. It would often be the nicest building in the village, replacing a mud structure in severe disrepair.

The steel pieces, roofing caps, and roofing sheets felt like a giant puzzle which they had only one day to solve. This time crunch was particularly challenging in the construction of the church in Mansa. Jeffrey and his friends needed to finish it that night in order to return to Riverside Farm early the next morning.

It was late in the evening when a raging storm ambushed the group as they were finishing the roof. The slanted, treacherously slick surface proved too detrimental for Moses. Jeffrey, who was on the opposite side of the roof, heard a commotion and was alarmed to discover that Moses had fallen to the ground. Miraculously, he was unharmed. Moses climbed back up, and they finished the job.

Jeffrey, Kristopher, and Moses helped build this one-day church in Chipata, Zambia. (Photo: Jeffrey Brownlow)

Jeffrey, Kristopher, and Moses helped build this one-day church in Chipata, Zambia. (Photo: Jeffrey Brownlow)

A few weeks later, in the village of Chipata, another storm rolled in while they were on the roof. Thoughts of their last run-in with rain flooded their minds, and they began to pray. The storm raced closer and closer, then suddenly veered around them, disappearing into the horizon.

“We praised God for keeping us safe as we completed that project,” Jeffrey remembers. “We were so excited to give those people a beautiful, sturdy place where they could worship.”

As Jeffrey returned to Southern to continue his business accounting studies this fall, he brought strengthened convictions and a new perspective. He joined the Student Missions Club and encourages others to go overseas and serve. At the same time, he sees more clearly than ever that the United States is a vital mission field, too.

“I am going to be a lot more focused on what is truly important,” Jeffrey says. “I want to share Christ and his gift of salvation in my relationships with others.”

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His Was a Life Well Lived

posted on October 31, 2015, under Member by

by Lynell LaMountain

Ron Halvorsen Sr., 77, passed away with the blessed hope of Jesus Christ very much alive in his heart. From 1986 until 2003, he served as Church Growth Director for Southern Union Conference. This photo of Diane, Ron, Ron Jr., and Carrol appeared in the cover story of the December 2006 issue of Southern Tidings. Visit the Tidings archives to learn what it was like growing up Halvorsen. Together, theirs was a wonderful life. (Photo: Ron Quick)

Ron Halvorsen Sr., 77, passed away with the blessed hope of Jesus Christ very much alive in his heart. From 1986 until 2003, he served as Church Growth Director for Southern Union Conference. This photo of Diane, Ron, Ron Jr., and Carrol appeared in the cover story of the December 2006 issue of Southern Tidings. Visit the Tidings archives to learn what it was like growing up Halvorsen. Together, theirs was a wonderful life. (Photo: Ron Quick)

Ron Halvorsen was born January 18, 1938, in Brooklyn, New York. He attended William E. Grady vocational high school which had a delinquency rate so high that a book, The Blackboard Jungle, was written about it and later made into a movie.

One day in 1954, Ron, who joked about having his own truancy officer, ditched school to see his neighborhood friend, Jim Londis, who attended Greater New York Academy. It was Week of Prayer, and Jim invited Ron to chapel. He pretended not to listen, but he felt the Holy Spirit tugging at his heart.

Ron skipped school every day that week to attend Week of Prayer. He responded to the altar call and gave his life to Christ. For a kid who spent his life on the run, he met the one thing he couldn’t outrun: the unconditional love and grace of Jesus.

He transferred to Greater New York Academy, but kept in touch with his friends in the gangs. He shared the Good News with them because he desired that they experience abundant life in Jesus. Some accepted Christ, others didn’t. One of his close friends said, “Ron, it costs too much to be a Christian,” to which Ron responded, “It costs too much NOT to be a Christian.” His friend stayed in the gangs and was later arrested for a violent crime and sent to prison.

Ron graduated from the academy in 1956 before enrolling at Atlantic Union College (AUC) to study theology and become a minister. Here, he fell in love with Carrol LaMountain. They married on September 1, 1957, and, for the next 58 years, worked as a team sharing the Good News that resulted in thousands of people giving their hearts to God and living with the hope of Christ’s soon return.

Graduating from AUC in 1961, Ron continued his religious studies at the Andrews University Theological Seminary before entering full-time ministry in 1962.

During the next 24 years, he pastored churches in Connecticut, Tennessee, Texas, and Maryland; was a full-time evangelist in Carolina Conference, New York City, and with Faith for Today; served as Ministerial Director for Mid-America Union Conference; and held field schools of evangelism for Andrews University, Southwestern Adventist University, and Union College.

In 1986, Ron accepted an invitation from Southern Union Conference to serve as Church Growth Director, a position he held until he retired in 2003. While here, he started the Lay Pastor Training program, held field schools of evangelism for Southern Adventist University, and organized Union-wide Evangelism Councils.

In retirement, Ron worked for It Is Written with Mark Finley, Shawn Boonstra, and John Bradshaw as Prayer Coordinator, in addition to holding evangelistic meetings resulting in more than 1,000 baptisms.

Ron served the Lord with great zeal. Ministry wasn’t his career—it was his calling. He spoke the truth and lived with passion. Young and old alike considered him their friend. Ron’s love for Jesus never wavered, even during life’s darkest moments. His faith was unshakable because his love for Christ was undying.

Ron’s love for his family was generous, faithful, and constant. He was their leader, shepherd, protector, mentor, hero, and friend. He was an outstanding husband to Carrol; father to Ron Jr. and Diane; grandfather to Ron III, William, Kelsey, and Stephanie; and great-grandfather to Noah and Katelynne.

Ron fought the good fight and finished the race. His was a life well lived in faithful service. The next sound he will hear is the voice of his Forever Friend calling him from the grave victorious over death. On that glorious day, Ron will be reunited with his family to celebrate the joy of eternity with them and the countless thousands who called him friend.

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Quilting Ministry Is Her Passion

posted on October 29, 2015, under Church, Member by

by Shereen Scheuneman

Centenarian Elda Mae Reichard participates in Forest Lake Church’s Prayers and Squares ministry by hand-sewing each quilt’s perimeter binding.

Centenarian Elda Mae Reichard participates in Forest Lake Church’s Prayers and Squares ministry by hand-sewing each quilt’s perimeter binding. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Elda Mae Reichard, is a special 100-year-old member of Prayers & Squares Ministry at Forest Lake Church, Apopka. Quilting ministry is her hobby, her passion! At home, she carefully hand sews the perimeter bindings of each quilt top before bringing her finished products to exchange for new quilt tops in need of hand sewn bindings.

Elda Mae celebrated her birthday at the Prayers & Squares quarterly birthday dinner when she turned 100 years old in May. At that time, she indicated that her goal had been to make prayer quilts until she was 100 years old, but now she was going to have to set a new goal!

Each Prayers & Squares meeting begins with many shared praises and prayer requests during a spirit-filled, prayerful, and interactive worship. It is love and intercessory prayer that transforms each quilt into a comforter.

Suddenly, the room is alive with activity. Six quilters work with fabric pieces forming intricate patterns soon to be sewn into unique quilt tops. Seam pressing, machine sewing, hand stitching, and knotting are all being done by more than a dozen ladies. Every quilt must have 60 knotted ties, each representing a special prayer for the person who will ultimately receive it.

To date, the dedicated members of this ministry have prepared 3,556 quilts for those facing major life challenges in 49 states and 35 countries. Each quilt requires 30 hours of work which equals 106,680 devoted hours of prayerful labor since 2004 when the ministry was formed under the prayerful and capable guidance of Jo Ann Roth. Collectively, these prayer quilts have blessed many people, and those who lovingly prepared each quilt are equally blessed.

Elda Mae's granddaughter, Aiko Ramdin, says, "Grandma continues to get up most mornings to have devotional time in her office. This picture says more about her than anything I could say."

Elda Mae’s granddaughter, Aiko Ramdin, says, “Grandma continues to get up most mornings to have devotional time in her office. This picture says more about her than anything I could say.” (Photo: Aiko Ramdin)

Elda Mae Thompson was born May 7, 1915, near Bloomington, Nebraska, as the youngest of eight brothers and sisters. She was married to Paul Reichard who passed away two and one half years ago.

Elda Mae retired from her career as a medical technologist at Kettering Hospital in Dayton, Ohio. As early as 1963, she and Jo Ann Roth, founder of the Forest Lake chapter of Prayers & Squares, made prayer quilts from used clothing for the Sunshine House at Kettering.

At 80, when she and her husband no longer participated in mission trips, and she retired from serving in the Kindergarten division, Elda Mae got into quilting. “She loves sewing and feels it gives her life purpose,” says daughter Margaret Hess. After moving to Florida in 2010, she became a member of Prayers & Squares.

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Saved In Prison

posted on June 03, 2015, under Conference, Member by

by Rebecca Knecht

Rebecca Knecht reconnects with pen pal Iralee Medder who encouraged Rebecca while she was in prison. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Rebecca Knecht reconnects with pen pal Iralee Medder who encouraged Rebecca while she was in prison. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

I’m a third-generation Adventist. I attended 12 grades and some college in Adventist schools. I sang solos and was a choir member. My children were Pathfinders, and I was on the staff. You may say, “So what? A lot of people have done that. There’s nothing special here.”

Life changed the day I found myself standing in front of a judge, hearing the word “Guilty.” What just happened? I told the truth. My daughter and son told the truth. How did a jury not believe us?

I was sentenced to 8½ years in prison, plus five years probation, for something I didn’t do. I couldn’t even comprehend the length of my sentence and had no idea how I would get through, but God knew.

Arriving at Lowell Correctional Institution in Ocala, Florida, I was terrified! After settling in, I found a chapel list on the bulletin board and learned that a local Adventist church came on Friday evenings. I was so excited to attend their service before I was transferred to Gadsden Correctional Facility near Tallahassee, Florida—five hours from family and friends. After getting situated, I found, to my disappointment, that no Adventist church held services there.

However, one day I saw a Florida Conference Prison Ministries newsletter, and I was elated. I opened the pages and saw where I could write to ask for prayer and a pen pal. I mailed off my requests.

I started receiving the monthly newsletter, and it wasn’t long until I met Iralee Medder through the Prison Ministries pen pal section. Her letters were inspirational and uplifting, and she often sent stamps. Sometimes, she sent copies of songs from the church hymnal. She also made sure I had the Adult Sabbath School Quarterly with Ellen G. White Helps. She faithfully wrote to me the remainder of time I was in prison.

Florida Conference Prison Ministries newsletters were a “God thing” that helped Rebecca through a difficult time in her life. As a Christian singer, Rebecca regularly visits churches to perform and share her testimony. She can be reached at knechtrebecca@yahoo.com (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Florida Conference Prison Ministries newsletters were a “God thing” that helped Rebecca through a difficult time in her life. As a Christian singer, Rebecca regularly visits churches to perform and share her testimony. She can be reached at knechtrebecca@yahoo.com (Photo: Lee Bennett)

After I had served my required 12+ months in Gadsden, I requested a move to Hernando Correctional Institution to be closer to family and friends. I wrote to Iralee and asked her to visit. Pen pals didn’t usually visit the inmates, but the authorities made an exception and gave her permission to see me.

After Iralee’s visitation was approved, she came to see me the next Sabbath. It was wonderful to finally meet my pen pal! We enjoyed visiting while a family member patiently waited for her.

When I was released in 2008, I returned to my home town to start probation. After completing less than nine months of a five-year probation, I requested a termination of my probation, and it was granted. My probation officer said he had never seen anything like that in all his time as a deputy and a probation officer. I looked at him and said, “It’s a God thing.” In 2009, I rededicated my life to God, and Iralee attended my rebaptism.

It was a “God thing,” all right. God was with me before I went to prison, He saved me in prison and when I was on probation, and He has been with me every day since. That’s why I pray, “Thank you, Heavenly Father, for your Son, Jesus; for Iralee; and for Florida Conference Prison Ministries for helping me through a difficult time.”

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Four Sisters Model Love the Old-fashioned Way

posted on June 03, 2015, under Member by

The Eldridge sisters and their spouses received congratulations from Old Fashioned film producer Nathan Nazario for the family milestone of 217 combined years of marriage. Standing from left: Nathan Nazario, Herb and Barbara Klischies, Howard and Charlotte Huenergardt, and Betty and Richard O’Ffill. Seated: Jack and Carol Carey. Jack and Nathan co-teach a Sabbath School class at Apopka Church. (Photo: Chris Carey)

The Eldridge sisters and their spouses received congratulations from Old Fashioned film producer Nathan Nazario for the family milestone of 217 combined years of marriage. Standing from left: Nathan Nazario, Herb and Barbara Klischies, Howard and Charlotte Huenergardt, and Betty and Richard O’Ffill. Seated: Jack and Carol Carey. Jack and Nathan co-teach a Sabbath School class at Apopka Church. (Photo: Chris Carey)

If you have forgotten what old-fashioned romance looks like, you may want to take a look at the new movie, Old Fashioned. It’s not your typical pulp fiction fare; it’s romance at its old-fashioned best. As the movie’s promotional tagline states, “Love is patient, love is kind, love is old fashioned.”

But the movie has nothing up on a striking example of old-fashioned romance exhibited in the heart of Central Florida by four sisters who have enjoyed 217 combined years of married bliss.

The sisters, with their parents Charles and Cassie Eldridge, moved to Orlando in 1947. All four girls graduated from Orlando Junior Academy (then Orlando Church School) and Forest Lake Academy, Apopka. All four were married at Kress Memorial Church in Winter Park.

Barbara married Herb Klischies, a commercial artist. Charlotte married Howard Huenergardt, an orthopedic surgeon. Betty married Richard O’Ffill, an ordained minister. Carol married Jack Carey, an educator. Each couple went their separate ways, living as far apart as Thailand, Pakistan, Maryland, and California. In retirement, they found their way back home to Florida where it all started.

Family is very important to these close-knit sisters. Between them, they have 14 children, 33 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

This year, Barbara and Herb Klischies celebrate 59 years of marriage; Betty and Richard O’Ffill, 55 years; Charlotte and Howard Huenergardt, 53 years; and Carol and Jack Carey, 50 years, for a grand total of 217 years of old-fashioned romance and commitment not often seen. From all appearances, the knots that tied these sisters to their spouses are not about to unravel.

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Porters Celebrate 65th Anniversary

posted on April 20, 2015, under Member by

Patricia and Ernest Porter.

Patricia and Ernest Porter.

Ernest and Patricia Porter celebrated their 65th anniversary on June 4, 2014. Ernest and the former Patricia Lein were married at Trinity Union Methodist Church in Providence, R.I.

Ernest began working with the Highway Department in Rhode Island while serving as a volunteer fireman for 15 years. He was employed as a hospital orderly and then in law enforcement at many stores in Massachusetts and Florida. His last position before retirement was a nursing home security guard at Brentwood Health Center, Lecanto, Fla.

Following many years as a homemaker, Patricia became a Licensed Practical Nurse in Florida and worked for the nursing home at Brentwood Health Center and Cypress Creek Juvenile Detention Center, Lecanto, Fla.

The Porters became Adventist church members in 1956 while living in Providence, R.I. They are now members of Inverness Church in Florida.

Their family consists of: four sons, Ray, Tom, Ernest Jr., and Daniel; five daughters, Deborah, Sandra, Judith, Susan, and Christine; 24 grandchildren; 27 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Their daughter, Deborah passed away in 1964, and Tom, a Vietnam veteran, passed away in 2009.

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Kossicks Celebrate 65th Anniversary

posted on April 20, 2015, under Member by

John and Betty Kossick. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

John and Betty Kossick. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

John Kossick and Betty Kasper were married April 23, 1950, in Akron First Church, Ohio, after meeting at a bus stop one year earlier to the day. After 65 years, John says, “Betty is the jewel God gave me. Her smile is the best part of the day.”

John served in the US Army Air Corps in Alaska with the Fire Rescue Squad and then became an electrician. In 1976, he left commercial electrical work and joined Kettering Medical Center, Ohio. He spent 18 years working as an electrician and/or a foreman with the specialty of troubleshooting at Adventist hospitals: White Memorial Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.; Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, Kans.; and back to Kettering Medical Center until retirement.

Betty pursued many artistic positions such as sign painting, window trimming, and furniture design. She served as a Bible worker and many office positions while she became a prolific writer. She has been published in more than 70 books and authored two, plus approximately 800 poems carrying her byline.

The Kossicks make their home at Florida Living Retirement Community in Apopka, Fla., where she is the press writer. Their door is always welcome to old and new friends. As one friend stated, “To know them is to love them.”

John is a deacon and Betty is the press writer for Florida Living Church. “Johnny is the priest of our home,” says Betty. I especially appreciate his prayers.”

The Kossick family includes: son, Kevin; daughter, Stephanie Moore; five grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

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MagaBook Students Shine for Jesus

posted on March 15, 2015, under Conference, Member by

by Les McCoy

Brittany Hodges.

Brittany Hodges.

Florida Conference sponsored two MagaBook programs this winter at Fort Myers and Lady Lake Churches. From mid-December through January, 49 students contacted more than 75,000 people for Christ. They delivered more than 6,000 books, prayed with more than 10,000 people, and received $86,636 in donations with 70% going toward school scholarships.

One of our most important ministries is getting our publications to the people so they can know what God requires of them and to be ready for His coming. These students did exactly that.

Brittany Hodges shares an experience from this past winter’s program which she calls, “Let the Lord Lead.”

I was in my last neighborhood of the night. It was a miracle how we gained access into the neighborhood because it was a gated, upper class community. My prayer was that the Lord would keep all of the canvassers in this neighborhood invisible until His perfect will was accomplished, and He did just that.

After a knocking on a few doors, I eventually reached that one person who the enemy uses to frighten us and say that we “shouldn’t be soliciting, and someone will call the cops.” I knew, once I got this message, my divine appointment was soon to come.

Not moments after, the Holy Spirit told me to turn around. Lo and behold, a man and his daughter were walking toward me. I began my speech about what I was doing in the community, and instantly the father was interested. He stood there with copies of Foods That Heal, Bible Answers, and The Great Controversy in his hands.

During our conversation, he asked, “What do you believe?” (The question I usually hear is, “What denomination are you?”) After giving my most tactful answer, he inquired about other books and soon received a copy of Desire of Ages, Lessons of Love, and Plants That Heal.

The testimony is not so much that he received six books on the spot, but it was as if the angels were literally pulling us toward each other. Mr. Paul’s house was not on my side of the street, but the Lord saw fit for us to meet at that time.

There were hundreds of experiences like this one. As Brittany concluded, “I’m grateful for how the Lord orchestrates these divine appointments, but we have to be in tune with Him in order to hear His still, small voice, and let the Lord lead.”

We are very thankful for the dedication and commitment our young people are willing to make for Jesus.

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She Witnessed on the Go

posted on March 15, 2015, under Member by

by Lesonie Walker

Erwin Rodrigo and Myret Howson-Stewart. (Photo: Guibert Etienne)

Erwin Rodrigo and Myret Howson-Stewart. (Photo: Guibert Etienne)

When Myret Howson-Stewart encountered Erwin Rodrigo in the parking lot for just three minutes, she had no idea she was pointing him to Christ.

Myret was leaving Miami to start a job in New York. While loading her car, a man from the neighborhood approached and remarked, “I see you are leaving us.” She affirmed and, while exchanging pleasantries, briefly told him about Christ. Myret promised to call Erwin from New York to continue their conversation, and she kept her promise.

During several conversations that followed, she discovered that he had serious medical and personal problems. Erwin’s health had deteriorated to the extent that he believed his suffering was caused by necromancy instigated by his unhappy wife.

Myret encouraged Erwin to visit Maranatha Seventh-day Adventist Church in Miami Gardens to meet with Pastor Newton King who, like him, was from Trinidad. Erwin later confessed he had no intention of meeting with an Adventist pastor.

Although Erwin would not visit the church, Myret was not discouraged. She kept witnessing to him for more than seven months by sending religious tracts, praying for his salvation, and encouraging him to seek proper medical attention. The nausea, vomiting, and other complications intensified, forcing Erwin to finally accept that he needed spiritual help to free him from what he described as “evil spirits.” In the mean time, “the praying lady in New York” alerted the pastor to expect a call from Erwin.

One Sabbath, Pastor King, who has a burden for souls, petitioned God to send someone who needed Christ. The next day, Erwin reluctantly called the pastor and expressed his need for spiritual help. The pastor rejoiced for Myret’s insistence and faithfulness and God’s immediate answer to his prayer. Erwin and the pastor met for prayer and Bible studies at least twice per week for one month. Erwin accepted Christ and was joyfully baptized.

Soon after, Erwin received a triple bypass cardiac surgery. He was hospitalized for three weeks, but experienced a remarkable recovery. Myret, who was unavoidably absent from his baptism, later surprised him at Maranatha Church. It was a picture-perfect moment when Myret and Erwin embraced each other—a soul had been born for Christ.

Erwin now praises God for his spiritual and physical healing, and declares that he is eager to share his faith with relatives and friends.

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