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Florida Living Retirement Community Celebrates Fifty Years of Service

posted on October 30, 2015, under Florida Living by

by Betty Kossick

Florida Conference President Mike Cauley speaks to those assembled at the 50th anniversary celebration of Florida Living Retirement Community in Apopka, Fla. Seated behind him, Apopka City Commissioner Diane Velazquez (center) and FLRC administrator Nancy Pleasants await their turn to address the attendees. (Photo: courtesy of Florida Living Retirement Community)

Florida Conference President Mike Cauley speaks to those assembled at the 50th anniversary celebration of Florida Living Retirement Community in Apopka, Fla. Seated behind him, Apopka City Commissioner Diane Velazquez (center) and FLRC administrator Nancy Pleasants await their turn to address the attendees. (Photo: courtesy of Florida Living Retirement Community)

On September 12, 1965, when Apopka was a small Florida town of 4,000 residents, Florida Living Retirement Community (FLRC) opened its doors to a community within a community. The two grew together and, 50 years later, with the City of Apopka pushing close to 50,000 residents, FLRC celebrated its 50th anniversary on Sunday, September 13, 2015.

The celebratory occasion was enhanced by the presence of Diane Velazquez, Apopka City Commissioner. With a detective background in law enforcement, Velazquez told the attendees how she used FLRC as a landmark to know she was nearing home when she first moved to Apopka from New York City. Her appreciation for Apopka as her new home meshed with the residents who find FLRC to be a home where friends become family.

Mike Cauley, president, and Duane Rollins, treasurer, represented Florida Conference which owns and operates FLRC. Other program participants were: Nancy Pleasants, FLRC administrator; Jim King, Florida Living Church pastor; Benjamin Reaves, Adventist Health System representative; and Russell Bates, retired pastor and FLRC resident. Musical selections included a trombone ensemble and a vocal rendition of “Bless This House” by Les Clark, accompanied by pianist Sharon Swafford.

Guests were invited to continue the celebration in the dining room at Guenther House with hors d’oeuvres and conversation while being entertained with “Songs from a Secret Garden” by Bonnie Hannah, pianist, and Ed Linquist, violinist.

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Friends Become Family at Florida Living

posted on April 20, 2015, under Florida Living by

The beautiful Florida Living Retirement Community campus has 95 dwellings that can accommodate up to 200 residents. (Photo: Martin Butler)

The beautiful Florida Living Retirement Community campus has 95 dwellings that can accommodate up to 200 residents. (Photo: Martin Butler)

by Betty Kossick

Florida Living Retirement Community family enjoy visiting together: Walter and Linda DeLeon, Don Weatherall, and John Kossick. (Photo: Betty Kossick)

Florida Living Retirement Community family enjoy visiting together: Walter and Linda DeLeon, Don Weatherall, and John Kossick. (Photo: Betty Kossick)

Known as a place where friends become family, Florida Living Retirement Community (FLRC), Apopka, is celebrating 50 years of service. The combined dreams of visionaries Arthur Guenther, D.D.S, and Kenneth Wright of an affordable facility for retired church workers and lay members were realized on September 12, 1965.

Early residents lived in orange grove fragrance. However, freezes and expanded apartment construction removed the citrus trees. The campus grew rapidly; yet, it didn’t emerge as high-rise retirement lodging.

Whether residents reside in a one- or two-bedroom apartment, a garden efficiency, or one of the four campus houses, all are considered family. Utilities, van transportation to local stores, trash pickup, lawn care, and maintenance are part of FLRC’s provisions. Vegetarian meals are served by ticket purchase.

A traditional Adventist church service is held in Fritsche Hall for residents and members from the community. There are also more than 50 Adventist churches within a 15-mile radius for members to visit and enjoy. “We found a little heaven on earth with a wonderful church family who are loving, kind, and considerate,” says former educator Don Weatherall.

Forest Lake Academy’s ASSIST program provides students to freely help residents with small household tasks or just keep residents company with a generation connection.

Residents anticipate the 50th anniversary celebration scheduled for Sunday, September 13, 2:00 p.m. at Fritsche Hall, followed by refreshments at the House of Guenther Dining Hall on campus. Those who plan to attend the 50th celebration should notify FLRC administrator Nancy Pleasants at (407) 862-2646. More information about FLRC is at floridalivingretirement.com or on Facebook.

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Bags of Love Comfort Kids in Crisis

posted on January 26, 2015, under Florida Living by

by Betty Kossick

“Kids really love the bags. They get so excited,” said Christina Gosch, an aide with Seminole County Child Protective Services, as she collected 20 Bags of Love in Apopka.

Bags of Love are lovingly created by Florida Living Retirement Community residents and Florida Living Church members with assistance from Forest Lake Academy students. Every four months, a group of volunteers puts 20 bags together to help children enduring a crisis such as abuse, neglect, poverty, homelessness, domestic violence, or an incarcerated parent.

The love bags, created to be age appropriate from infancy through 17, contain donated items such as a quilt, pillow with case, towel, wash cloth, and two small bags. One bag holds toiletry items, and the other holds such things as a flashlight, various toys and games, books, and stuffed animals.

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Florida Living Artisans Exhibit Work

posted on January 04, 2015, under Florida Living by

Carol Janssen exhibited her quilts and facilitated the Florida Living Retirement Center Artisan Exhibit. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Carol Janssen exhibited her quilts and facilitated the Florida Living Retirement Center Artisan Exhibit. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Artist Von Stimpson served as a missionary nurse to Pitcairn Island on three different occasions with her pastor husband, Ollie. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

Artist Von Stimpson served as a missionary nurse to Pitcairn Island on three different occasions with her pastor husband, Ollie. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

by Betty Kossick

Residents and friends of Florida Living Retirement Community (FLRC) in Apopka, Fla., recently held a two-day fine arts, crafts, and hobbies show highlighting their talents in recent and past accomplishments.

While browsing through 23 exhibits, attendees gained new perspectives about the talented artisans. “I’m excited about the variety of arts done by this age group, including lost arts that have reappeared,” said FLRC’s Administrator, Nancy Pleasants. “It’s very insightful of those who included these arts from the past that are memory connected.”

Facilitated by FLRC resident Carol Janssen, the exhibition showcased needlework, crafts, paintings, woodwork, photography, and published works. The mediums, materials, and skills used made each of the items unique. One talent which could not be hidden was the aroma of fresh baked bread.

Many who exhibited their handiwork were retired missionaries, pastors, or professionals in the fields of medicine and education. Two students from Forest Lake Academy joined the exhibit and displayed their quilt-making abilities.

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Urban Missionaries With a Passion To Impact Lives In Florida

posted on January 17, 2014, under Church, Florida Living by

What if a church translated Proverbs 18:24, “A man who has friends must himself be friendly…” into “a church that has friends must itself be friendly?”

When the Adventist Church becomes involved, members of the community begin to notice. Former prejudices are broken down and people become receptive to the gospel message.

Creativity abounds in outreach methods that members throughout Florida Conference are using to minister in their communities:

Lighthouse Mission Group member Emanuel Depina prays with a homeless man. (Photo: Angela Davies)

Lighthouse Mission Group member Emanuel Depina prays with a homeless man. (Photo: Angela Davies)

Friendship Without an Agenda
The Lighthouse Community Mission Group in Orlando targets the unchurched and the urban community. They have adopted 300 families living in an extended-stay hotel, and, three times a week, they are involved in mentoring the children and helping wherever needed.

One Sabbath a month, mission group members visit the homeless at Lake Eola in downtown Orlando to talk, listen, pray, and give a book to each person before handing them a lunch. Members have found that being friendly matters as much to the homeless as does the food they receive.

These new friendships often bring questions about the Lighthouse ministry and have led to Bible studies, church attendance, and baptisms.

West Palm Beach Spanish Church provides health fairs for the community twice each year. (Photo: Sandra Rivera)

West Palm Beach Spanish Church provides health fairs for the community twice each year. (Photo: Sandra Rivera)

Hispanics in Action for Community Education and Rehabilitation (H.A.C.E.R.)
Founded by individuals from West Palm Beach Spanish Church, this organization meets needs of people in the community in addition to their spiritual needs.

Besides reaching more than 300 families a month through a food pantry, H.A.C.E.R. provides biannual health fairs with a variety of free exams, vaccinations, tests, and ultrasounds. In order to help low-income families cope with the need for affordable housing, H.A.C.E.R. purchased and renovated a four-unit complex in Palm Beach County and named it Nehemiah House.

The Way and StandUp For Kids are headquartered at Jacksonville Mandarin Church’s downtown outreach center. (Photo: Rasa Truitt)

The Way and StandUp For Kids are headquartered at Jacksonville Mandarin Church’s downtown outreach center. (Photo: Rasa Truitt)

J.B. and Angel received help from Jacksonville Mandarin Church young adults. (Photo: David Fischer)

J.B. and Angel received help from Jacksonville Mandarin Church young adults. (Photo: David Fischer)

Jacksonville Outreach Center
Several years ago, Jacksonville Mandarin Church Pastor Juan Rodriguez became co-executive director of StandUp For Kids, a community program that rescues homeless young people. Soon, Mandarin Church young adults joined in searching for needy young people living on the streets.

In addition, leaders at Mandarin wanted to help the adult homeless community, so they opened an outreach center to house The Way, which is the church’s ministry for adults. It also headquarters the Jacksonville branch of the Atlanta-based nonprofit, StandUp For Kids.

One day while middle school students from Jacksonville Adventist Academy were involved in street ministry with Pastor Jonathan Peinado from Jacksonville First Church, they asked a man sitting on a bench eating his lunch if there was anything he would like to have them pray about. The man had just found out his wife had cancer, and he needed prayer at that moment. The young people believe God led them to this man just as He has led the volunteers to many other homeless individuals.

Following lunch, bikers rode for a local charity. (Photo: Olga Bryant)

Following lunch, bikers rode for a local charity. (Photo: Olga Bryant)

Biker Sabbath
“A real game changer in our service to the community came when we invited motorcyclists from the community and Central Florida,” says Dan Forbes, pastor of South Orlando Church. The church filled to capacity, and special provisions were made to accommodate the motorcycles that arrived in the parking lot. Gift bags were presented to each guest.

After the worship service, bikers joined members for a fellowship luncheon and a charity ride that raised $425 to benefit Harbor House in its efforts to end domestic violence.

Forest Lake Church in Apopka hosted two Feeding Children Everywhere events in the gymnasium at Forest Lake Academy. A combined total of 90,000 meals were packaged for hungry children and their families in Greater Orlando. (Photo: Delwin Finch)

Forest Lake Church in Apopka hosted two Feeding Children Everywhere events in the gymnasium at Forest Lake Academy. A combined total of 90,000 meals were packaged for hungry children and their families in Greater Orlando. (Photo: Delwin Finch)

Meals Packed With Love Feed Children In Orlando Area
In 2012, Forest Lake Church, Apopka, held the first of two Pack the Forest events to prepare meals for hungry families. In 50 minutes time, 190 members and friends packed 30,000 healthy meals, each with ingredients to serve a family of six. The bulk of the meals went to middle school students in Orlando to share with their families on the weekends. Needed funding of $7,500 was raised from small donations of children emptying their piggy banks to a larger anonymous gift of $1,000.

A second Pack the Forest event in November 2013 saw 300 volunteers pack 60,000 meals after $16,200 was raised in donations. The meals were given to Community Food and Outreach Center for distribution to families throughout Central Florida.

Robin Davis, left, and Schenelle Morrison gave food samples to health fair guests. (Photo: Jeffrey Thompson)

Robin Davis, left, and Schenelle Morrison gave food samples to health fair guests. (Photo: Jeffrey Thompson)

Health Fairs
Fort Lauderdale Church’s Healthy Lifestyle ~ Longer Life partnering event on the Stranahan High School campus is an example of health events held throughout Florida. Attendees take advantage of free medical screenings and handouts from local providers.

Margate Church volunteers team up with LifeNet4Families in feeding the homeless. (Photo: Julia Tedim)

Margate Church volunteers team up with LifeNet4Families in feeding the homeless. (Photo: Julia Tedim)

Ministry To the Elderly and Homeless
On the first and last Sabbath of each month, a team of Margate members and Pathfinders visit an assisted living center for ministry to the elderly through praise, prayer, and the spoken Word. Their reward has come when tearful residents have extended their arms for hugs.

Margate Church members also feed more than 230 homeless men and women on the second Wednesday of each month.

Putting the finishing touches on cupcakes bound for Good Samaritan Mission. (Photo: Allen Rogers)

Putting the finishing touches on cupcakes bound for Good Samaritan Mission. (Photo: Allen Rogers)

1,000 Cupcakes
“Let’s have our own Cupcake Wars and take 1,000 cupcakes to migrant workers,” suggested 13-year-old Allison Rogers from Brandon Church. Four mother/daughter teams met at the church to bake, fill, and frost cupcakes for a meal hosted at a community health services event sponsored by Good Samaritan Mission in Wimauma. Church teens also provided a puppet ministry while children and parents waited for free dental cleaning, immunizations, eye exams, back-to-school supplies, and tickets for food furnished by the Mission.

Florida Living residents donated all the items used to fill Bags of Love, including hand-made quilts, pillows with cases, towels and washcloths, an assortment of personal toiletry items, toys, story books, and stuffed animals. (Photo: Stephen Yost)

Florida Living residents donated all the items used to fill Bags of Love, including hand-made quilts, pillows with cases, towels and washcloths, an assortment of personal toiletry items, toys, story books, and stuffed animals. (Photo: Stephen Yost)

Bags of Love
Florida Living residents in Apopka assembled 15 Bags of Love for children removed from their homes because of abuse or a parent or guardian in trouble with the law. The children are given a bag as they are taken to a safe place by the County Child Protective Services.

Each bag carries the inscription, “It’s My Very Own.” Inside is a handmade quilt, pillow with case, towel and washcloth, a small bag with age-appropriate personal toiletry items, toys, puzzles, coloring books with crayons, story books, and stuffed animals.

Florida Conference’s Vision: To be a 21st-century missionary movement, effectively reaching people of all ages and cultures.

One of our five Values embodies this Vision: We are committed to the empowerment of every member to serve as a 21st-century missionary where they live, work, and play.

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Making Friends Without an Agenda

posted on October 15, 2013, under Church, Florida Living, Video Report by

by Gladys Neigel

Mission trips have a way of bringing conviction to the hearts of participants; yet, after returning home, these feelings often die or lay dormant. Such was not the case with Gabriel Cardona. He immediately sought to share the good news of the gospel.

Cardona began to pass out literature such as Steps To Christ and necessities such as baby diapers on South Orange Blossom Trail, Orlando, in an area of drugs, prostitution, and criminal activity. Joining him in this venture were Emilio Navarro, David Hernandez, and Julio Ramirez. It wasn’t long until 30 individuals, including street people, were consistently involved in the program.

Lighthouse Community Mission Group member Emanuel Depina prays with a homeless man. (Photo: Angela Davies)

Lighthouse Community Mission Group member Emanuel Depina prays with a homeless man. (Photo: Angela Davies)

Because this ministry targeted the unchurched and the urban community, the group became involved in working with residents of an extended-stay hotel. For two years, they visited the residents every week and became involved by playing with the children and meeting needs where possible. “The purpose was to make a spiritual connection without an agenda,” says Cardona.

The group started holding a relaxed service at various churches on Sabbaths at 2:00 p.m. They never invited people to church; however, questions about the ministry often led to Bible studies and church attendance which have culminated in four baptisms.

After two years, the group, which had taken on the name Lighthouse Ministries, moved to Altamonte Springs, adopted 300 families residing at Remington Inn and Suites, and began visiting three times a week. Church services are now held in a nearby storefront through the generosity of Florida Living Church members in Apopka.

Once a month, “church” is brought to the Remington community with field day games for kids, free clothing, free food, etc. They recently provided the children with backpacks for going back to school. “The goal is to uplift Christ in the community and in our relationships as we meet people where they are,” says Navarro.

Lighthouse Community Mission Group members prepare lunches to give to homeless with whom they later talk, listen, and pray. (Photo: Angela Davies)

Lighthouse Community Mission Group members prepare lunches to give to homeless with whom they later talk, listen, and pray. (Photo: Angela Davies)

One Sabbath each month, they pack sack lunches to take to Lake Eola in Orlando. Here, they find homeless people scattered throughout the park. First, they sit down, talk, listen, pray, and give a book to each individual before handing a lunch to them, as being friendly matters as much to the homeless as does the food.

The next goal is to find a location large enough to house a place of worship and a community center where classes can be conducted in healthful living, computer usage, studying for the GED high school equivalency test, résumé preparation, and money management. They also plan to provide tutoring, counseling, free wireless internet, and recreation.

Matthew 7:20, “By their fruits, ye shall know them,” definitely applies to the results of this endeavor, with amazing changes happening in people. “When those we are serving come back, we know Christ is making a difference,” says Cardona. “This ‘love in generation’ is tired of hearing sermons and want to see actions of Christ. We are also tired of preaching, so we are focusing on actions of Christ.”

More than 25 individuals became charter members of Lighthouse Mission Group August 31 as they were welcomed by members of Florida Living Church which sponsors the new congregation. (Photo: Aric Turlington)

More than 25 individuals became charter members of Lighthouse Community Mission Group August 31 as they were welcomed by members of Florida Living Church which sponsors the new congregation. (Photo: Aric Turlington)

Florida Living Church Celebrates More Than 25 New Members

It was the dream of Lighthouse Ministries’ lay pastors, Gabriel Cardona, Willie Ramos, and Emilio Navarro, to plant a church from their ministry of more than four years. Florida Living Church, Apopka, adopted this group because of their close proximity, and so that members could become involved in soul-winning activities, if only vicariously.

The first step was to officially become a mission group as voted by the Florida Conference Executive Committee on July 30, 2013. The second step was on August 31 when the sponsoring Florida Living Church congregation welcomed the 25+ members into their fellowship. During the service, Gabriel Cardona was ordained as head elder for the mission group.

Florida Living Church Pastor Jim King, left, congratulates the lay pastors for the new Lighthouse Mission Group, Emilio Navarro, Gabriel Cardona, and Willie Ramos. (Photo: Aric Turlington)

Florida Living Church Pastor Jim King, left, congratulates the lay pastors for the new Lighthouse Community Mission Group, Emilio Navarro, Gabriel Cardona, and Willie Ramos. (Photo: Aric Turlington)

The two congregations are a unique fit with senior citizens from a retirement community comprising the majority of the Florida Living Church congregation, and the Lighthouse congregation mostly consisting of 20- to 30-year-olds. “They can teach us,” says Ramos. “With the wisdom of the old and energy of the new, together we can finish the work.”

“This group is highly motivated and involved by point-to-point ministry—meeting people where they are—which was the ministry of Jesus,” says Jim King, pastor of Florida Living Church. “It is our desire to help them with any particular resource we can provide to help accomplish this mission.”

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The Measure of a Man: Horace Edward Walsh—67 Years of Service For the Master

posted on August 31, 2012, under Church, Florida Living, Member by

UPDATE: Horace Walsh passed away Thursday, August 29, 2013 at age 93. Services held September 3 at Forest Lake Seventh-day Adventist Church, 515 Harley Lester Lane, Apopka. Visitation: 1:30-2:30 p.m.. Funeral: 2:30-3:30 p.m. Military Honors: 4:00-4:15 p.m. at Deltona Memorial Gardens, 1295 Saxon Blvd., Orange City.

More information is available at the Deltona Memorial Funeral Home web site.

Horace Edward Walsh. (Photo: Lee Bennett)

by Gladys Neigel

What great accomplishments would propel a person to the cover of Florida Focus? Can you tell the measure of the man from a photograph? Let me introduce you to Horace Edward Walsh.

As a young man, Horace had two interests that might have guided his career track: Baseball—In his early teens, he spent several days as an official bat boy for the Washington Senators baseball team during spring training in Orlando. Music—Horace worked with a vocal instructor in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to train his Irish tenor voice. In order to accompany himself, he studied piano. Later, he was privileged to attend The Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1939, Horace enrolled at Washington Missionary College (now Washington Adventist University) in Takoma Park, Maryland. After a few months as a student in pre-medical studies, he felt the call of the gospel ministry and changed his major to theology.

Following graduation, he was assigned as a singing evangelist for an evangelistic campaign in Salisbury, Maryland. Horace willingly accepted the duties assigned him except when the sermon was on hell, and Evangelist Dan Harris wanted him to dress in a devil suit, stand on a corner, and pass out fliers.

Horace’s first pastorate was in Wilmington, Delaware. One of the young people, Elizabeth Sterndale, remembers him playing volleyball and starting a camera club for them.

Later, two firsts came into Horace’s life: he was the first to receive a Master of Divinity degree from the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary and the first Adventist minister chosen to become a military chaplain.

1st Lieutenant Horace Walsh, first Adventist Army Chaplain, proudly donned his uniform some 60 years later at the June 10 retirement celebration. (Photo: Lori Bennett)

“Congratulations, Horace, on your retirement after nearly 67 years of ministry,” wrote Gary Councell, Director of Adventist Chaplaincy Ministries. “You are the first to receive Ecclesiastical Endorsement from the [Seventh-day Adventist] denomination as a chaplain. Since your visionary and courageous step, more than 200 men and women have followed your example and legacy.”

After the military, Horace became Chaplain at Loma Linda Hospital (now Loma Linda University Medical Center) in California and taught Bible classes for 10 years at Loma Linda College of Medical Evangelists. His inventive nature soon had him presenting a daily devotional program, Silver Linings, that was piped into each patient’s hospital room.

While pastor of Florida Living Church at Florida Living Retirement Community in Apopka, Horace was appreciated for his compassion. Pictured: Horace prays with Betty Downs at the neighboring Florida Living Nursing Center. (Photo: Les Clark)

Horace went on to pastor in Rochester, New York; Miami Temple Church, Miami, Florida; and Forest Lake Church in Apopka, Florida, before his first attempt at retirement in 1983. He continued to preach in various churches for two years before returning to Miami Temple Church where he helped plant the Kendall Church in Miami. He then pastored churches in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and DeLand, Florida, before his 17 year pastorate began at Florida Living Church, Apopka, Florida.

As an example of this beloved pastor’s influence over the years, several people who attended a June 10, 2012, retirement celebration shared their stories. Dr. Ted Furnish, a Urologist from Spokane, Washington, told how his choice to not carry a gun while in the Army in Germany had upset his superiors. A fellow soldier whose mother was an Adventist told him to “go see that Adventist Chaplain” to get him out of the mess.

Furnish, who wasn’t a church member, attended the Adventist service and spoke to Chaplain Walsh. Soon, he was taking Bible studies, and even before his baptism, Horace had him teaching the Sabbath School lesson. Dr. Furnish’s comment, “Thanks so much for the introduction,” was a testimony of his gratitude to Horace for bringing him into the Church.

Carmen Rodriguez, Florida Conference Executive Secretary, presented a plaque to Horace commemorating his years of service. (Photo: Lori Bennett)

At age 92, with 67 years of service, Horace Walsh closes his ministry as senior pastor of a congregation and stands tall among the denomination’s elder statesmen. To recognize this milestone, members gathered on June 10 to honor their highly respected friend and celebrate with him in thankfulness for his many years of service for the Master.

Rejoicing with them were Horace’s daughter, Bronwyn and her husband, Bob; and grandchildren, Bobby and Sam. Horace’s son, Bryan and his wife, Callie, could not attend.

Horace’s first wife, Pat, passed away in 1977 and his second wife, Aimee, passed away shortly after they came to Florida Living Church.

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Retirement Community Residents Prepare Bags of Love

posted on June 08, 2012, under Florida Living by

by Carol Janssen

Seminole County Child Protective Services representative Melissa Kreinbring, right, with Florida Living Retirement Community residents, from left, Von Stimpson, Carol Janssen, and Elsie McClanahan. (Photo: Stephen Yost)

Florida Living Retirement Community residents in Apopka recently assembled 15 Bags of Love for children removed from their homes because of abuse or living with a parent or guardian who has run into trouble with the law. Often these children are taken away from their homes late at night after witnessing an arrest by police.

As the children enter a Seminole County Child Protective Services (CPS) vehicle that will take them to a safe place, they are given one of the Bags of Love which carry an inscription, “It’s My Very Own.” Inside the bag is a handmade quilt, pillow with case, towel and washcloth, a small bag with age-appropriate personal toiletry items, toys, puzzles, coloring books with crayons, story books, and stuffed animals.

When Melissa Kreinbring, CPS representative, visited Florida Living Retirement Community to pick up the 15 Bags of Love, she showed her gratitude with expressions that included “awesome” and “terrific.”

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Florida Living Residents Create Ways to Share God’s Love

posted on June 09, 2011, under Florida Living by

by Nancy Pleasants

Florida Living residents in Apopka, Fla., have found creative ways to share their love for the Lord:

  • Christmas bags for long-care nursing facility patients containing large bibs or aprons made by the women, as well as other essential items.
  • Small quilts and lap robes for those in the long-care facility.
  • Baby supplies crocheted for Florida Hospital Altamonte included baby blankets, caps, and booties for needy newborns.
  • Greeting cards made to be shared.
  • Floral arrangements put together by a group of residents to bring a little cheer to others.
  • One resident keeps a puzzle going that brings lots of folks together to participate even for a few moments.

“The spirit of the residents at Florida Living is Christ in action by taking care of the needs of those who need that loving touch of the Savior,” says Nancy Pleasants, administrator.

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Florida Living Residents Display Arts and Crafts

posted on February 15, 2011, under Florida Living by

by Robert Janssen

Residents of Florida Living Retirement Community in Apopka displayed the results of their God-given talents at an Arts and Crafts Display held in the Retirement Center’s meeting room for three days in mid-January.

Forty-six different art mediums were represented by 21 senior citizens, including: intricate needlework, calligraphy, wood crafts, Christmas decorations, stained glass, and ceramics. The show also included pictures from seven resident artists. An item that drew considerable attention was a hymnal translated into the Chichawa language that is used in Malawi, Africa.

The purpose of the show was to encourage residents to get involved in making useful items that can be shared with others.

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